Hot Springs in Oceania

Vanessa Locampo
Last Updated: July 20th, 2023

The countries of Oceania are known for their wondrous and sometimes otherworldly land formations. From the bubbling volcanoes of New Zealand to the tropical jungles of Vanuatu to the red outback of Australia, this area in the southern part of the planet is filled with natural sights to take your breath away.

There are many hot springs in Oceania/Australia to discover, though they tend not to be as famous as the hot springs in other locations.

While destinations like Hungary, Costa Rica, and South Africa are known for their thermal baths, international tourists tend to forget about those in Australia, New Zealand, and the surrounding islands.

Australian-Bush

New Zealand is perhaps the most well-known location in Oceania when it comes to volcanoes, hot springs, and thermal activity. But there are notable hot springs in Oceania that we will take a closer look at in this article,

List of Hot Springs in Oceania

Thermal-Lake-Champagne-Pool

  • Peninsula Hot Springs, Victoria, Australia
  • Polynesian Spa, Rotorua, New Zealand
  • Sabeto Hot Spring and Mud Pool, Fiji
  • Kimberley Warm Springs, Tasmania, Australia
  • Kawhia Springs, Waitomo, New Zealand
  • Terter Hot Spring Bungalows, Vanuatu
  • Hammer Springs, Canterbury, New Zealand
  • Innot Hot Springs, Queensland, Australia
  • Kaitoke Hot Springs, Great Barrier Island, New Zealand
  • Hell’s Gate, Rotorua, New Zealand
  • Tekapo Springs, Tekapo, New Zealand
  • Dalhousie Springs, South Australia, Australia
  • Hot Water Beach, Coromandel, New Zealand

FAQ’s

What is the biggest hot spring in Oceania?

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The biggest hot spring in Oceania also happens to be the biggest hot spring in the world! Inferno Crater Lake in the Waimangu Volcanic Rift Valley in New Zealand is the world’s biggest, and has a maximum depth of 98 feet.

Of course, as the name suggests, this isn’t the type of hot spring you can soak in due to the temperatures ranging from 95 to 176 degrees Fahrenheit. But the turquoise blue color makes it one of the most beautiful hot springs to view!

Do you have to pay to visit hot springs in Oceania?

In most cases, you will have to pay to use hot springs in Oceania, as many are part of wellness resorts. Prices vary but note that Australia and New Zealand in particular tend to be expensive travel destinations compared to some countries in Asia or the US.

For example, one of the popular spa resorts, Peninsula Hot Springs, in Australia, has a variety of bathing experiences on offer, and prices start at 35 AUD (approximately 24 USD) for an hour.

Peninsula-Hot-Springs

That said, there are also plenty of free hot springs, particularly in Australia. These are often found in national parks or in remote outback areas.

One of the most notable free options is Katherine Hot Springs in the Northern Territory, near the township of Katherine.

Is it safe to visit hot springs in Australia?

Mataranka-River

The same rules generally apply for visiting hot springs in Australia as they do in other spas and hot spring facilities around the world.

The only difference is with some primitive hot springs in certain areas of Australia (particularly in Queensland and the Northern Territory), there is the chance of running into crocodiles near any body of water.

The crocodiles that you might see near hot springs are likely to be freshwater rather than saltwater crocodiles and are much less likely to cause harm to humans. Still, it’s always important to be cautious and pay attention to all signs in the area.

Note that many popular swimming locations in the Northern Territory will close during the wet season (November through April) as the flooding of waterways gives saltwater crocodiles access to inland bodies of water.

Where is the best place to visit in Oceania for a hot springs experience?

Thermal-Spring

Most nations in Oceania have hot springs, but one of the most well-known destinations in Rotorua in New Zealand. The city on the country’s North Island has a reputation for its geothermal activity.

There are a handful of hot springs in the city alone, including one of the most famous, Hell’s Gate Geothermal Park & Mud Spa.

You will also find geothermal features here that are not for swimming but are exciting to view, including boiling lakes and geysers. Rotorua is definitely worth a visit if you’re interested in hot pools!

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Are there any hot springs on New Zealand’s South Island?

Pohutu-Geyser

Although Rotorua, New Zealand’s hot spring mecca, is on the North Island, it’s still worth visiting the South Island if you want to experience a thermal soak. According to Broadsheet, there are several spas, pools, and resorts on the South Island.

Some of the best thermal locations on the South Island to add to your itinerary include Hanmer Springs Thermal Pools and Spa, which is just 90 minutes to the north of Christchurch, and the Onsen Hot Pools in Queenstown.

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What’s the difference between hot springs and thermal springs?

No difference! Hot springs and thermal springs are the same, but this can get confusing as hot springs are commonly referred to as thermal springs in Australia and New Zealand.

Is it easy to reach Oceania from the United States?

Oceania may be on the other side of the world, but getting there is easier than it looks. You can easily get direct flights to Australia and New Zealand from various locations in the United States, and there are also some direct flights to the lesser-known Oceanic destinations, including Fiji and Vanuatu.

If you are planning on visiting countries in this area from the United States or Europe, keep in mind that flying times can be upwards of 20 hours. It might not be worth traveling to destinations in Australasia if you don’t have at least a week (and ideally more) to spare.

Final Thoughts

There are endless hot springs to explore in Oceania, with New Zealand’s Rotorua being a global star on the geothermal scene.

Visiting hot springs in this part of the world still gives you the chance to have a refined and relaxing spa experience, if you so choose. But there is also the opportunity to enjoy a soak in a primitive desert hot pool or an outdoor mud bath.

Just be wary of those crocs when hot pooling in the Australian outback!

About The Author

Vanessa Locampo

Vanessa is an Australian-based freelance writer and editor with a BA in Creative Writing. She’s passionate about creating travel content that inspires her readers to take a leap of faith and power through their bucket lists. When she’s not writing (with her border collie asleep at her feet), she’s devouring books, exploring the world, or planning her next trip.

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